Home pageAbout usFAQ'sLinksContact us

Please Note: gapfilla.com was started in England by Australians, and is now being
converted over to the Australian environment, so while the British flag appears at
the top of the page, that page has not yet been converted. When it has ...
... it gets an Aussie flag! Oi! Oi! Oi!

Consumables - Brackets (back to index)

Introduction

Many of the brackets shown below are useful items for repair and strengthening purposes, but should not necessarily be considered for structural support, unless specifically recommended for that purpose (we have included joist hangars because they are a related item). Others are purposely designed for shelf mounting, and are well designed to that task.

The main attraction of these brackets is that they can often help out when nothing else will achieve the desired result.

Below we detail some of the more common brackets:

Straight Plates

Particularly useful for strengthening timber, in particular to restrain splitting boards.

Installation is generally directly into timber using supplied wood screws.

T Bracket

Particularly useful for securing T joints in timber. Uses include repairs and extra support for framing joints, though should be a last resort to normal joining practices.

Installation is generally directly into timber using supplied wood screws.

Angle Plates

Particularly useful for securing 90 degree joints in timber. Uses include repairs and extra support for framing joints, though should be a last resort to normal joining practices.

Installation is generally directly into timber using supplied wood screws.

Corner Brace

Particularly useful for securing pieces of timber or framework to walls, as a hidden bracket rather than a surface fit. Uses include repairs and extra support for framing joints.

Installation is generally directly into timber using supplied wood screws.

Corner brackets

Particularly useful for securing corners, as a hidden bracket rather than a surface fit. Uses include repairs and extra support for framing joints.

Installation is generally directly into timber using supplied wood screws.

Simple Shelf Brackets

Developed in a range of shapes and sizes to suit most shelving needs, and best secured directly to a solid wall (using wall plugs) or the studs in a plasterboard or cavity wall using wood screws.

Some shapes are probably better suited to private storage areas, such as the tool shed and garage, whereas others are more suited to reception areas. It is still though, not a preferred visual shelf mounting technique.

This is a neat idea for a loose fitting shelf that is available at a few outlets. To install, simply drill two holes in a masonry wall and insert the wall plugs. Then assemble the tubular supports and screw directly into the wall plugs. The tube has provision for turning using a spanner, but if you are going to install the shelf on a timber frame, be generous with pre-drilling the holes, as that size thread into solid timber may well twist the tubular sections. The rubber o-rings support and act as anti-slip for the shelf. An added feature, and not visible here is that the tubes have offset threads, allowing a small amount of adjustment of each tube to ensure leveling.

Remember, unless additional fixings are used, this shelf simply rests on the brackets, so avoid areas where bumping is a possibility (and don't put your best crockery on it).

 

Please be advised: gapfilla.com does not purport to be an expert in all facets of diy, but has significant experience in almost all of the topics covered on this site. We suggest that all persons take adequate care in the translation and application of this content to their projects, particularly as projects rarely encounter identical issues and constraints. If in doubt, we suggest you seek advice from a professional tradesperson or advisor. All material copyright gapfilla.com 2005-13